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Dec. 4th, 2018

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madman101

What Was Manafort Doing In Ecuador?

NYT: Manafort Tried to Broker Deal With Ecuador to Hand Assange Over to U.S.
There is no evidence that Paul Manafort was working with President Trump or other administration officials on the talks, which stemmed from 2017 discussions on Chinese investment.

What Was Manafort Doing In Ecuador?

Yesterday evening I eagerly read this new story from the Times about Paul Manafort’s discussions with the then-President-elect of Ecuador about the fate of Julian Assange. Remember that a week ago The Guardian published what seemed like a bombshell report that Manafort had met repeatedly with Assange and as recently as the Spring of 2016. If true, this would bring central elements of the conspiracy together more tightly than even many Trump/Russia maximalists might have suspected. But no other news outlets could independently confirm the report. Manafort, meanwhile, issued a broad, blanket denial. A couple days later some people were wondering if The Guardian had gotten burned or even been the target of a hoax. Now we have the Times picking up on this closely related but distinct part of the story – Manafort’s meeting with Lenin Moreno about Assange leaving the Embassy. But the Times article just doesn’t make sense. Or rather, it keeps the critical question unresolved.

Let’s discuss this...

NOTE: My own hunch is that Trump wanted to release Assange somehow, in accord with his Alex Jones base, but wanted to hide his plan from the GOP, since he did campaign on Assange being some kind of devil. That slip-up where documents were released, revealing strategies to prosecute Assange, was actually deliberate, in attempt to get Assange released based on a mistrial.

Oct. 31st, 2018

* - galaxy

madman101

How tech companies deceive you into giving up your data and privacy

Oct. 25th, 2018

* - galaxy

madman101

'City of Surveillance'

Oct. 21st, 2018

* - galaxy

madman101

How The FBI Silences Whistleblowers

How The FBI Silences Whistleblowers
Speaking truth to power has ruined Darin Jones, a former FBI contract specialist who reported evidence of serious procurement improprieties. He should be the last federal whistleblower victimized…

The idea of “whistleblowing” has been in the news a great deal.

Is the anonymous author of a recent New York Times op-ed eviscerating the president a whistleblower?

Is the victim of an alleged sexual assault by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh a whistleblower?

I’m fortunate to have access to the media to talk about torture after blowing the whistle on the CIA’s program. I think Ed Snowden, Tom Drake and others would say the same thing about the aftermath of their own whistleblowing.

Cost of Doing the Right Thing

The problem is that we are the exception to the rule. Most whistleblowers either suffer in anonymity or are personally, professionally, socially and financially ruined for speaking truth to power. Darin Jones is one of those people. He’s one of the people silenced in Barack Obama’s war on whistleblowers. And he continues to suffer under Donald Trump.

Jones was an FBI supervisory contract specialist who in 2012 reported evidence of serious procurement improprieties to his superior. Jones maintained that Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) had been awarded a $40 million contract improperly because a former FBI official with responsibility for granting the contract then was hired as a consultant at CSC. Jones said, rightly, that this was a violation of the Procurement Integrity Act. He made seven other disclosures alleging financial improprieties in the FBI, and he was promptly fired for his troubles.

Remember, the United States has a Whistleblower Protection Act.  Any federal employee who brings to light evidence of waste, fraud, abuse, illegality, or threats to the public health or public safety is protected under federal statute.

The FBI didn’t care, though. Jones was a troublemaker. He was talking about his fellow FBI agents. And he had to be silenced.

Immediately upon his firing, Jones appealed. He was not reinstated, however, because he had made his revelation to his supervisor and not to one of the nine people on the FBI leadership-approved list of who could hear a whistleblower complaint. Jones appealed again, beginning a more than four-year odyssey.

- Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa).

Oct. 12th, 2018

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madman101

How whistle-blowers shape history


tedtalks-video Kelly Richmond Pope

Oct. 10th, 2018

* - egypt - scribe

madman101

‘I had a moral duty’: whistleblowers on why they spoke up

‘I had a moral duty’: whistleblowers on why they spoke up

They took on warmongers, sexual abuse and tax dodgers. Would they do it again?

In an age where information is tightly controlled by image-makers, spin doctors and gatekeepers, real scandal can often only be revealed with the help of whistleblowers.

To mark the 25th anniversary of the whistleblowing charity Protect (formerly known as Public Concern at Work) – we focus on 12 people who have taken great personal risk to expose everything from warmongers to tax dodgers and sexual and physical abuse.

Continue reading...

Oct. 2nd, 2018

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madman101

Chelsea Manning says life in the US is like being in prison

Oct. 1st, 2018

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madman101

Amerika the Googlized...

Sep. 22nd, 2018

* - egypt - scribe

madman101

You Can Make the House of Representatives Restore Net Neutrality

You Can Make the House of Representatives Restore Net Neutrality

For all intents and purposes, the fate of net neutrality this year sits completely within the hands of a majority of members of the House of Representatives. For one thing, the Senate has already voted to reverse the FCC. For another, 218 members of the House can agree to sign a discharge petition and force a vote to the floor, and nothing could stop it procedurally. This represents the last, best chance for a 2018 end to the FCC’s misguided journey into abandoning consumer protection authority over ISPs such as Comcast and AT&T.

But we need you to take the time to contact your elected officials and make your voice heard. Do not underestimate your power to protect the Internet. You’ve done it before when we stopped Congress from passing the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) as it barreled forward towards passage. We’ve even done it on net neutrality just this year. Every time it seemed the ISP lobby had control over the state legislative process and was going to ruin progress on net neutrality laws, we collectively overcame their influence. In fact, every state that has passed net neutrality legislation so far as interim protections have done so on a bipartisan basis.

That should come as no surprise as 86 percent of Americans opposed the FCC decision to repeal net neutrality. At the end of the day the House of Representatives is the political body that is explicitly designed to represent the majority opinion in this country. That means you, your friends, and your family have to speak out now to force the change. No amount of special interest influence is more important or more powerful than Team Internet.

To help you make your voice heard, EFF has provided a guide on how to contact your Member of Congress and navigate the process of meeting your representative. You can also look up who represents you by going here and contact them.

Take Action

Tell Congress to Sign the Discharge Petition to Support Net Neutrality

Electronic Freedom foundation - https://www.eff.org

And see: The Game is Rigged: Congress Invites No Consumer Privacy Advocates to its Consumer Privacy Hearing

Jul. 24th, 2018

cheers - sunshine rainbow

madman101

Inside WikiLeaks

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